chapter spot 4 colorchapterspot5 colorchapterspot6 colorchapterspot7

These are the remaining 4 illustrations John did for the book, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World”, by Doris Wild Helmering.

Book Description:
A fun, uplifting middle-grade adventure for the entire family!

Blowing off homework, being harassed by the school bully and barely surviving a biking accident, 12-year-old Alex while working on a homework assignment not only discovers the secrets of motivation, but learns that bugs are eaten in many parts of the world. A visit to a cricket farm, raising earthworms, and developing a few bug recipes of his own, leads to a science project involving his entire class. A business contract with Power Foods Exclusive finds Alex, friends and family poised to cure hunger and feed every human on this planet with a nutritionally sound, environmentally friendly food source.

To purchase prints of these illustrations go to: www.johndyessart.com

This book is available on iTunes and Amazon.
For more information visit www.doriswildhelmering.com

Full color grasshopper illustration by John Dyess

This is the second of 6 illustrations created by John for the book, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World”, by Doris Wild Helmering. Illustrated by John Dyess.

A question from a recent interview with the author:

How is the style of the illustrations connected to the story?   

Doris: “I’ve known John Dyess, the illustrator, for many years and have admired his work. So I was delighted when he agreed to illustrate the book. When I look at John’s work, I feel a connection: whether an illustration of a beautiful trout about to take a hook for Field & Stream or a bunch of guys playing basketball. That’s what I wanted the kids to feel when looking at the various bugs – a connection. When I first saw the illustrations for the book, I was blown-away.”

To purchase prints of these illustrations go to: www.johndyessart.com

This book is available on iTunes and Amazon.
For more information visit www.doriswildhelmering.com

 

Cricket Illustration

Full color cricket illustration by John Dyess

This is the first of 6 illustrations created by John for the book, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World”, by Doris Wild Helmering. Illustrated by John Dyess.

A question from a recent interview with the author:

Why crickets? Has the question of food shortage interested you for a while?

Doris: “Years ago, I had read that you could eat crickets. So when I was working on the book, I started exploring what bugs people eat in other parts of the world. I got so interested that I visited a cricket farm in Florida. And what an education I got! I incorporated that experience and had Alex and his family and Mr. D visiting a cricket farm and then, of course, Alex’s entire class raising crickets as part of their class science
project.”

To purchase prints of these illustrations go to: www.johndyessart.com

This book is available on iTunes and Amazon.
For more information visit www.doriswildhelmering.com

Book cover design and concept by Carolyn Dyess, Illustration by John Dyess

This book cover was a joint project with both John and Carolyn. St. Louis author and  therapist, Doris Wild Helmering, employed the couple to visually represent her creation, “The Boy Whose Idea Could Feed the World”.  The E-book is now available on Amazon and iTunes. John did his iconic black graphic line work and texture to render the darkling beetle. Carolyn came up with the “world” map idea coming through the body of the beetle, and designed the bold typography that pulls the whole cover together. The variance in size, case and color, using the ever dependable Helvetica Black Condensed, with the black pseudo drop shadow, “contains” the bug from escaping off the page.

John did 6 full color illustrations of various bugs and worms used as vignette art throughout the chapter openings of the book. Those illustrations will be featured individually in upcoming blog posts.

For more information about Doris Wild Helmering visit: www.doriswildhelmering.com

triangle shapes

Triangle shapes on a wall and ceiling.

Here are a few things I have observed in July of 2017 and since I haven’t posted many images in July, I decide to share a few of my observations.
I was visiting with my son and his sons, two of my eight  grandchildren, in Overland Park Kansas, in July and saw the above image projected on a wall and ceiling in his house. This may become a painting.

deer in yard July 2017

Deer in my backyard. Many animals visit our home, including rabbits,raccoons, squirrels deer,and birds.This deer was observed in July 2017.

squirrel July 2017

Many squirrels visit our house, especially our bird feeders. This squirrel was seen in July 2017.

 

 

Sophia's drawing 72217001

This is a drawing, by my grand-daughter Sophia, of Pikachu,a Pokemon character.She just turned seven years old and drew this from memory. Yesterday she asked me how I painted pictures so real. Then we then went to my studio where she drew and colored Pikachu. I was impressed that she showed the highlights in the eyes. I began drawing comic book characters when I was a child, about that age,and many years later I’m still drawing and painting. My son Mike and his two sons went to Pokemon Go in Chicago ,this weekend. That’s three of my grandchildren doing Pokemon activities. I better learn about Pokemon.

 

 

Egyptian Necklace

This is an oil on canvas painting of my wife Carolyn,wearing a necklace,earrings and bracelet, given to her by a friend of her father. This necklace and bracelet was purchased in Egypt. The painting is titled “Egyptian Necklace”

Egyptian Necklace detail

This is a detail of my painting of Carolyn that shows my technique of applying a thin wash of oil paint thinned in turpentine and Liquin paint medium.

for oil on canvas terchnique t

This is a photo of  Liquin paint medium, a brush, a rag and a jar that contains purple oil paint mixed with Liquin and turpentine which I applied to a painting I am currently working on.  I applied the paint over the painting with the brush than wiped the surface with the rag leaving paint in the valleys of the canvas.

I used burnt umber for the mixture of Liquin ,turpentine and paint on my wife’s painting. When this wash dried I applied oil paint on the peaks of the canvas using a dry brush technique. The necklace,earring and bracelet  was painted last, using a well used bristle brush loaded with oil paint.

Egyptian

Photo reference for Egyptian Necklace.

Sylvester ( model ) 1983

This is my painting of Sylvester that was painted from photographs that I took during a painting session in 1983.

I projected the slide photograph on canvas and drew in pencil on canvas the projected image. When oil paint is applied the pencil drawing is completely covered. Below are photographs of another unfinished portrait using this technique.

oil on canvas step one drawing

Pencil drawing on canvas  that I  drew over the projected slide photograph . Then I used acrylic paint  with a brush to block in values and shapes. After this process is complete I begin to use oil paint over the pencil drawing and acrylic paint.This is as far as I got on this painting.

oil on canvas tecnique

detail from unfinished painting.The canvas size is 24″ wide x 30″ high. There is more to the drawing then I have shown.

Delanie Painting1-10

This is a portrait of my grand-daughter Delanie that began by drawing a projected image of a photograph that I took of her. The  hair was painted with a sable brush that had about four strands of hair on it. This is an oil on canvas painting from the early 2000’s.

Delanie 1

This is one of the many photographs that I took of Delanie, but is not the photograph that I used for the painting.

canvas texture001

When I begin a painting on canvas I apply oil paint that has been thinned with turpentine to fill in the valleys of the canvas and then I begin adding oil  paint on the peaks of the canvas using a dry brush application.

Sylvester 1977

Portrait,in oil, of Sylvester a native American model,painted from life.

I painted this portrait ,from life, in 1977. This was one of the first painting sessions that I joined  a group of St.Louis illustrators and was the beginning of many years of painting from a model with this group of friends. I sold this painting to another artist, while I was employed at Maritz Motivation Company. It had hung along with other of my illustrations in the company art gallery.
Several years later this same model posed, and I took reference photos of him posing.
scanI used this photo as reference for an oil painting. I will describe the painting process of this painting on my next blog.

Fritz

Oil on canvas painting of a model named FritzFritz

Painting from a model is relaxing and fun for me. On this blog post I have including paintings of models in various stages of my process. The painting of Fritz is an example of the final stage. I focus on seeing shapes not a nose or ear or mouth.

portrait 4

This is the first step of my process. I block in broad simple shapes

portrait 6

This is another example of the first stage.

portrait 2

This is an example of oil paint on cardboard.

portrait 3

Oil paint on cardboard.