Posts Tagged ‘hunger’

Grocery Cart

Grocery Cart by John Dyess

Does the subject of a painting or lack of a subject change the value of a painting? I’ve created illustrations professionally since I was 22 years old. My illustrations have always had a subject in them and usually a story to tell. Creating illustrations with a subject has provided me with an income to buy things, and pay taxes. My illustrations were created for clients to sell a product, educate children, inform, and tell stories.
Now I create paintings to please myself. My paintings still have a subject and sometimes tell a story.
Grocery Cart is one in a series of paintings that I call “Black shapes and textures”.
My painting Grocery Cart is based on a photograph that I took in a grocery store parking lot.  This Polaroid photo was taken many years ago to use as reference  for a commercial illustration assignment. Recently I was sorting through old Polaroid photos and found this photo. I scanned it into my computer and added a texture that I had painted. Now for me this image of an empty  grocery  cart represents hunger and homelessness.
I have included in this post a comment my friend “Dev”  made about my blog post “What’s the value of a painting”  page 1. Thank you Dev, your comment means a lot to me.

“It allows you to express something inside you – like what you saw when you looked at the fruit. Maybe it was a sense of awe, maybe you were struck by the color or the arrangement or the shadow and light but the art reflects that inner experience. Or perhaps you use the fruit as a metaphor for abundance or what have you. For me the viewer, I can experience what you did by “seeing through your eyes” or I can recall fruit from my past that had meaning for me. I also can just enjoy the beauty of the work, or sense the emotion, or find my own meaning.
At any rate because you chose to paint this and I saw it we connected at some level and shared an experience. I think that is what art does (and a whole lot more but I won’t continue to fill the page!) Now I’ll read page 2.  Dev

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Like Janis

And you measure for wealth by the things you can hold
And you measure for love by the sweet things you’re told
And you live in the past or a dream that you’re in
And your selfishness is your cardinal sin
—Rodriguez

I had an art gallery opening “to Everything there is a Season ” of my paintings and drawings on May 20,2018 at the Gallery Within- Webster Groves Christian Church.
I arranged the 77 images of my art into 14 categories to explore themes of freedom, wonder, nature, and more ,accompanied by complimentary lyrics, poetry, literature and scripture. This collage titled “Grocery Cart” is in  a category called What’s the Cost Of Living

Homelessness

For me, “Grocery Cart” represents hunger, and homelessness. The image of the grocery cart was a Polaroid photo that I had taken for an illustration assignment in the 1960’s. I scanned the Polaroid photo, enhanced it in Photoshop and printed a copy. I glued it in a collage along with a bar code, a price torn out of a newspaper and a ledger page. Between glued layers I added enamel paint textures

 

 

A better Tomorrow

                                                         A Better Tomorrow

My collage image represents advertisements trying to convince you to buy products that will make “a better tomorrow” for you and result in happiness. My illustration commissions were part of that business for a number of years. Later in my career I preferred editorial story illustrations.

 

 

grocery-cart

“Grocery cart” mixed media art by John Foster Dyess

I have been creating images like my “Grocery Cart” for several years. These images are created using photographs I have taken.
I merge a high contrast black and white conversion of my photograph ,in photoshop, with a scanned texture layer I have created traditionally. The final step is to print these images on canvas and paint over the print with oil or enamel paint.
For me this art represents hunger,and homelessness.
Other art I have created is available as a print and is also available printed on towels,pillows tote bagsT shirts,cups and other items. To view my paintings and drawings please visit johndyessart.com

What is the Cost of Living collage by John Dyess

What is the Cost of Living collage by John Dyess

Before digital cameras,before one hour film processing,illustrators that needed a reference photo used Polaroid cameras.I used a Polaroid “Land Camera”
,which I purchased in the early 1960’s. This camera only used black and white film,which,if you didn’t want the picture to fade,required a coating of  plastic,that came in an applicator with the box of Polaroid film.Several years ago I found a box of Polaroid reference photos, that I had used for various assignments during the 1960’s and 1970’s, and these photos were faded and discolored.I decided to use these Polaroid photos in the collage painting,that is displayed above.
This painting “What is the Cost of Living” was accepted in a St.louis Artists’ Guild exhibit several years ago and I have decided to put this painting in an exhibition titled Ode to Peace at The Gallery Within Webster Groves Christian Church. The theme of my painting is about what keeps people from having peace.

Polaroid of a grocery cart

Polaroid of a grocery cart

This Polaroid of a grocery cart was taken as reference for a drawing for a grocery store advertisement. For this collage it represents hunger and poverty.I scanned the Polaroid
photo and printed it on ledger paper. Surrounding the photo are bar codes and food advertisement that I cut out of a local newspaper

Polaroid photo of a boy boy with a BB gun.

Polaroid photo of a boy boy with a BB gun.

This Polaroid photo was taken around 1970 and was used as reference for an illustration printed in a Daisy rifle catalog.The photo faded over time and there is a light glare on the BB gun which I find interesting.I cut an advertisement out of a newspaper which states “One of the largest selections of firearms in the area”, that I pasted to the left of the boy

model dressed in army fatigues holding a T-square

model dressed in army fatigues holding a T-square

This Polaroid photo was taken of a co-worker at Scott AFB for use as reference for an illustration I did for the cover of an annual report for  the Military Air Transport Service.I dressed Wes up in my army uniform-I was at this time,during the 1960s, in the US Army Reserves– and had him hold a T-square which I turned into a rifle in this illustration.It’s hard to see in this photo that Wes is wearing a helmet ( also known as a “Steel Pot”). I’m glad I saved these photos, for they  have a new meaning to me.

Photograph of R.T. Keating

Photograph of R.T. Keating

This was scanned from a black and white photo of my cousin R.T. Keating taken in Korea during the Korean War. I cut out the Help Us from a newspaper.and-there-was-light-
This text was scanned from the an Old Testament Bible.
Yesterday I added the burnt frame to the collage.I have shown things that keep us from having “Peace”-poverty,hunger,war,conflict,fear,loneliness.